football grounds now defunct

Chat about anything football related here!
User avatar
cockneyhammer
Posts: 4296
Joined: Thu May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Location: we are all we got we are all we need

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby cockneyhammer » Sun Dec 03, 2017 2:28 pm

today we have a look at edgware town fc the white lion ground


Edgware Town were established in the summer of 1939 and played in the Middlesex Senior League. The name of the club was changed to Edgware F.C. in 1972, and back to Edgware Town in 1987. In 2006-07 Edgware Town enjoyed their most successful season in the club's history, winning a treble of trophies, the Spartan South Midlands League Premier Division, the Spartan South Midlands Football League Premier Cup, and the Spartan South Midlands Football Challenge Trophy. Noteable ex players include Dave Beasant (a goalkeeper who later went on play in the FA Cup final victory for Wimbledon) & Ralf Little (who is also an actor - perhaps best known in the Royle Family).A "sell-on" clause in the Dave Beasant contract meant that Edgware received a substantial sum when Wimbledon sold him to Newcastle United and the money was spent on improvements to the ground

The record attendance (approx 8500) at the White Lion ground was set in October 1947 for the F.A. Cup tie against Wealdstone.
After playing for 68 years at the White Lion Ground in Edgware, the freehold of the ground was sold & the new landlord was subsequently granted planning permission by Harrow Council to build houses and flats on the ground. The team carried on playing through the 2007/08 season but the sponsorship could not be found to continue to pay the ground rent. After finishing a respectable 8th in the Ryman Division 1 North.The club were forced to resign from the Ryman League in the summer of 2008, and are currently dormant, though the club's name continues to be registered with the Middlesex FA.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image


present

Image
1 x

User avatar
cockneyhammer
Posts: 4296
Joined: Thu May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Location: we are all we got we are all we need

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby cockneyhammer » Sun Dec 10, 2017 12:59 pm

lets have a look at feltham fc


Feltham is a town in the London Borough of Hounslow, at the edge of west London. Feltham is centred 13.5 miles west south west of the conventional Centre of London and 2 miles south of Heathrow Airport. Feltham formed an ancient parish in the Spelthorne Hundred of Middlesex. It has a record in the Doomsday Book which records 21 households and an annual value to its lord of the manor of six pounds sterling, taxable at 12 geld units and was held as lord and tenant-in-chief by Robert, Count of Mortain. A large area of ten cultivated ploughlands is recorded. In 1831 Feltham occupied an area of 2,620 acres, stretching into Hounslow Heath and had a population of 924. The Waterloo to Reading Line established a station here from its construction in 1848. From 1894 to 1904 the Feltham parish was included in the Staines Rural District. In 1901 the parish had a population of 4,534 and accordingly in 1904 it was split from the rural district to form the Feltham Urban District. In 1932 the parishes of Hanworth and East Bedfont were also transferred from the Staines district to Feltham Urban District. Feltham has been associated with land and air transport for more than a century. The Feltham tramcar was once manufactured and ran along the tracks of many municipal operators, though never in Feltham itself. In the same area of the town, aircraft manufacture was an important industry, particularly during the war years. Feltham was in the early and mid-twentieth century home to Britain's second largest railway marshalling yard, which was geared towards freight, and was a target for German air force bombs during World War II.



Feltham Football Club was originally established in 1946 as Tudor Park F.C., the club changed its name to Feltham in 1963 in recognition of being granted senior status. In 1981, they won Isthmian League Division Two.
.


Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
0 x

User avatar
H4L
Posts: 396
Joined: Sun May 29, 2016 9:31 am
Contact:

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby H4L » Sun Dec 10, 2017 6:35 pm

Feltham F.C, well I never! Played loads of times there at Feltham Arena man and boy. What a place to pop up on here.
0 x

User avatar
cockneyhammer
Posts: 4296
Joined: Thu May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Location: we are all we got we are all we need

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby cockneyhammer » Sat Dec 23, 2017 5:32 am

today we visut scotland and falkirk brockville park

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
0 x

User avatar
cockneyhammer
Posts: 4296
Joined: Thu May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Location: we are all we got we are all we need

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby cockneyhammer » Sat Dec 30, 2017 7:17 pm

today we come closer to home and we visit woodford town

Woodford Town FC was formed in 1937, initially playing in local leagues before becoming founder members of the Delphian League in 1951. In 1961 they moved into the Metropolitan League and then joined the Greater London League in 1967, however within three years they had moved back to the Metropolitan League.

At the end of the 1970–71 season they joined Division One South of the Southern League which was a step too high for them and left after finishing bottom of the league. They joined the Esex Senior League in 1976 and then in 1979 switched to the Athenian League. In 1982 they moved back into the Southern League. Then followed a brief period of success whereby the Club played in the Anglo-Italian Cup in 1986 losing to Piacenza in the semi and then to Merthyr Tydfil in the third place play off. The following season they finished third in the Southern League and reached the first round of the FA Cup for the first time, they dropped back into the Essex Senior League at the end of the season.

In 1993 the club lost the ground where the cache can be found and moved to the Spartan League. However, they left the league in 1998 and dropped into the London Intermediate League and then returned to the Essex Senior League in 1999. They remained in the league until being voted out in 2003 after finishing bottom of the league for three seasons in a row.

The great Johnny Haynes played for Woodford Town as a schoolboy and Jimmy Greaves also played briefly for the club at the end of his career.

There has been talk of this club reforming however as of 2012 the club remains dissolved and the ground in a state of decay and disrepair. The gates to the ground are looked and secure, however of you go down the alley down the side you can see into the ground and see what remains of this once famous footbal club.


Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
1 x

User avatar
cockneyhammer
Posts: 4296
Joined: Thu May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Location: we are all we got we are all we need

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby cockneyhammer » Mon Jan 01, 2018 1:52 pm

ok lets have a look at another local club never new they did a badge will be trying to get hold off it today we go to
COLLIER ROW FC SUNGATE GROUND

The disappearance from the football scene in the mid 1990’s of Collier Row Football Club could almost pass unnoticed but one remarkable remnant of their 67 year history. Their Sungate ground, home since 1948, still exists not only dormant and unloved but actually buried lock, stock and barrel under thousands of tonnes of landfill like some modern day sporting equivalent of Herculaneum.

Collier Row was originally a small village which like many would be swallowed up in the untamed urban sprawl that is now called Metropolitan Essex. The football club formed in 1929 as a team called Hamden United and were called Collier Row Motor Gear as recently as 1980. The club had originally played at the nearby White Hart Lane before securing a patch of land in the adjoining road, Collier Row Road. The ground developed, particularly in the 1970’s when a large clubhouse was opened and sat proudly above pitch level. Long before the new millenium purge of ground grading and uniformity a small covered stand was erected with comfy padded seats rescued from Butlin’s in Clacton. Legend would say that in turn Butlin’s had acquired the seats from the ocean liner the Queen Mary. Provenance was never established although their antiquity was undoubted.

In the 1970’s the club gained no little infamy for the employment of a notoriously ill-tempered billy goat to keep the pitch in check. After a butting incident too many the committee voted on more traditional mowing methods for the Sungate surface.

Collier Row had progressed nicely if somewhat sedately through the Essex Olympian and London Spartan Leagues before gaining promotion to the Isthmian League in 1986. Promotion to Division One in their second season was to proved their finest hour as the club flitted between the Second and Third Divisions on a regular basis. What proved to be their final season as a single entity however, 1995/96, saw the Row finish in a creditable fifth place in Division Two.

Meanwhile some four years earlier a reformation of the old Romford Football Club had seen them competing in the Essex Senior League groundsharing initially at Hornchurch’s Bridge Avenue before spending the 1995/96 campaign at Ford United’s Rush Green Road ground. Amid rumours of skullduggery and a hostile take over, Romford moved into Sungate and join forces as Collier Row and Romford. Initially the move seemed mutually beneficial as the amalgamated clubs won the Division Two title ahead of runners-up Leatherhead. However, the nature of the merger became wholly apparent the following season when Collier Row was dropped from the amalgamated name and disappeared altogether.

By 2001 the ground had been sold and the Romford club continued on their nomadic ways via Ford United, Aveley and most recently Thurrock. This despite being granted planning permission in 2009 for a new ground of their own on Westlands Playing Fields in London Road.

So what of Sungate? In this densely populated area one would assume it had been sold off for redevelopment as affordable housing, but an altogether more unusual demise awaited. Sungate had a strange location, open fields and beech trees to the north, south and east would be the antithesis of the west aspect which was tightly hemmed in by a garage, a café and a garden centre. The illusive owner refused to listen to any potential new tenants, the perennially nomadic Eton Manor were one interested party, and promptly locked the ground up for good. Seeking to make money from new landfill and environmental charges the owner allowed tipping onto the site at an incredible rate. The low slung stand and clubhouse now lie under the current surface of the landfill, although the clubhouse roof can still be made out. The rusting collection of still erect floodlight pylons gives a clear orientation to the pitch that lies beneath.

So there in lies the dilemma, a belligerent owner and a football ground that is now surely too costly to clear and return to active use. One can only wonder what future archaeologists will make when they uncover this most unique burial ground.


so so sad

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
1 x

User avatar
Diamondhammer
Posts: 90
Joined: Tue May 31, 2016 12:56 am
Location: Northants

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby Diamondhammer » Mon Jan 01, 2018 10:56 pm

cockneyhammer wrote:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmLFoMCx47I


Took this last year ..... Rushden and Diamonds ground totally gone, really hurt to watch the YouTube video, spent some time there over the years.
Attachments
image.jpeg
All that's left now, taken last year, totally demolished
image.jpeg (244.59 KiB) Viewed 931 times
0 x

User avatar
cockneyhammer
Posts: 4296
Joined: Thu May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Location: we are all we got we are all we need

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby cockneyhammer » Tue Jan 02, 2018 7:01 am

Diamondhammer wrote:
cockneyhammer wrote:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmLFoMCx47I


Took this last year ..... Rushden and Diamonds ground totally gone, really hurt to watch the YouTube video, spent some time there over the years.




thanks for posting that mate what a sad photo wonder who there fans went on to support
0 x

User avatar
cockneyhammer
Posts: 4296
Joined: Thu May 26, 2016 8:17 pm
Location: we are all we got we are all we need

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby cockneyhammer » Sat Jan 13, 2018 12:40 pm

today we go to geo's country scotland amd we have a look at st mirren


With St Mirren on the lookout for a new ground, Love Street was up there towards the top of my Scottish grounds to visit list, so their Sunday fixture against Rangers seemed an ideal time, scheduling it in for a weekend trip with Ayr vs Brechin the day before.

Having stayed overnight in Glasgow, the trip to Paisley was fairly easy, with it being a short bus ride there (no trains running), and I arrived just before midday, leaving me enough time to go to the ground first, managing to be let in early to take a few pictures, before going back to town to take up some time prior to kick-off.

Having had a look round what was a fairly nice place (plenty of impressive architecture if you like that sort of thing), then it was back up Love Street, with the roads being a bit more crowded than earlier thanks to people heading in the same direction. Unfortunately, there was no sign of a club shop (or even a badge seller), which was disappointing, especially as a Rangers club shop takes pride of place on Paisley High Street (makes you wonder how anyone outside of the big 2 can ever have a hope of competing really), so slightly disappointed at that, I made my way in, having chosen to sit in the Reid Kerr College Stand behind the near goal. That was a small single tiered stand, with a basic, albeit attractive design of black/red striped seats covered by a propped roof stand that with pillars behind the seats offered perfect views of the pitch. To our right was the North Stand, a former terrace with seats stuck on and a pitched roof which was painted in black and white stripes along its length, which made it stand out well. Opposite was the West Stand, which was a modern single tier stand and very steep, whilst to the left was the Main Stand, which was a classic old design, with two tiers of seating and running for about a third of the length of the pitch, centred on the halfway line. One interesting feature was that on both sides, the roof extended beyond the length of the stands which was made to look even odder with glass screen ends next to the seating. To the east of the Main and North Stands was some former disused terracing, which presumably carried on around the end where the Reid Kerr College Stand now stood.

Having surveyed the scene and taken a few pics (as usual!), the game eventually got underway, and soon turned into a similar pattern as to all the other matches that I’ve seen so far involving the two old firm sides. Rangers were able to take an early advantage when Nacho Novo fired home after some lax defending by the home side. It was a blow to the hosts, but as the rest of the half wore on, St Mirren began to get more into it, and realising that the Rangers side weren’t quite as invincible as they’re made out to be, they grew in confidence and were unlucky not to have found an equaliser by the break.

In the second half it was all the home side, they pressed Rangers for most of the match, forcing several good saves from goalkeeper Alan McGregor, but St Mirren just couldn’t find the goal that their efforts deserved, with Rangers managing to hang on to a somewhat undeserved three points, with their only attack of note in the second half being a disallowed goal from Kris Boyd, who had strayed into an offside position when heading home a free kick.

With the game finished, I quickly made my way out of the ground, managing to get the bus back to Glasgow in good time, having a bit of a wait there until the train across to Edinburgh and then one South from there.

Overall, it had been a good finish to the weekend, and although it was disappointing not to see St Mirren get something from the game, it didn’t deter from what was a great ground to visit. With plenty of character, it will be a real shame to lose Love Street from the 42, as other than perhaps adding some executive boxes to bring in extra revenue (plenty of space to do so), the ground seems perfectly adequate for the clubs needs, being a good sized capacity, whilst offering good views and facilities. Perhaps rebuild the Main Stand and you would have all you need in a ground, so the message, as usual, is get there whilst you can before Scotland (and Britain as a whole) loses another good old traditional ground to a new one that looks like it could have come straight off the shelf at IKEA or B&Q.

thanks to for the information http://tims92.blogspot.co.uk/2011/03/st ... nd-no.html


Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/loca ... s-10271638
0 x

User avatar
H4L
Posts: 396
Joined: Sun May 29, 2016 9:31 am
Contact:

Re: football grounds now defunct

Postby H4L » Sat Jan 13, 2018 7:45 pm

Collier Row, very sad indeed.
1 x


Return to “Football Talk”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 29 guests